How to handle the PASS Summit.

About this time every year, there are a plethora of articles that offer advice on how to handle the upcoming PASS Summit. And well they should – it’s a huge event. There are thousands of people congregating there and so, so, SO MUCH to do. Special interest events and community mixers abound. And I’m not even going to touch the number of parties, both public and private, and the sightseeing and karaoke and… Oh, yeah – there’s a conference there, too. Tons of educational material, networking sessions, professional development opportunities, the MS CAT Team and…

Yeah – it’s a lot. Especially to try and pack into three+ days.

One of the things that I’ve heard time and time again is about the opportunities for networking. In fact, there’s a saying about that which I’ve heard used many times regarding this event. It’s, “If you’re eating dinner / lunch, etc… by yourself, you’re doing it wrong.” And to be honest, that kind of rubs me the wrong way.

While I try very hard to be friendly and approachable, I’m not exactly the most social person. Now, if you’re reading this and planning to attend the Summit, please don’t take this to mean I don’t want to talk to you. I most definitely do. Hey – if you read my blog on even a semi-regular basis, I consider you a BFF and will likely buy you a drink in appreciation. :-)

What I’m saying, though, is that I fit the current popular definition of an Introvert. Not a big fan of crowds, I don’t generally stay out that late, and really – I need time to myself to recharge. If you don’t see me running around during the event, it’s likely that I’ve slipped off to my hotel room for a cat nap or down to Pike’s Place for a solo walk by the water. I suspect that there are more than a few of you out there that fit that definition as well.  If so, then this post is for you.

If you’re eating a meal by yourself, that’s FINE.

Just here for the sessions? GREAT.

Want to go sightseeing alone after the day’s events? PERFECT.

Yes, there’s a lot to do there, but you shouldn’t feel like you have to do it all, nor should you feel like you have to jump out of your comfort zone in order to do it. Sure, taking a risk can pay off, and getting a little outside your comfort zone with a little professional networking is one way to do that. It has certainly paid off for me. But it’s hard. I get that. So don’t feel like you’re missing something if you don’t. Don’t feel bad. You’re fine.

And I hope to see you there. But if I don’t, that’s OK. :-)

Thanks for reading.

-David.

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