SQL Saturday Rochester Recap and Speaker Feedback

Rochester, you all are so, so kind… :-)

First things first: Big thanks to Matt Slocum, Andy Levy and their entire crew, the sponsors, the speakers, the volunteers, everyone who put together such a fun event. SQL Saturday Rochester was a great time.

I started my day off in Colleen Morrow’s session: “So You Want To Be A DBA?” It’s a question I’ve posed to quite a few people recently, as I’ve been approached by multiple people interested in the career track. I always kind of struggle to describe what I do and what makes a good DBA. Colleen doesn’t struggle with this at all. She did a great job, presenting all the main points, pains and proclivities of a DBA, and even had a fun quiz in her session. The quiz showed the background of several well known people in the community and the attendees were asked to match the person to the bio. I was a bit surprised at a couple of them, which was very cool.

Next up, I went to Adam Belebczuk’s session, “XML Without Xanax.” My knowledge of XML is sorely lacking. (Read, just enough to pass an exam.) So, I was desperate for some help and better insight into how SQL stores and actually works with XML. Adam didn’t disappoint. One of the really good takeaways I got from this session was the idea of using an XSD schema definition as a sort of column constraint, where XML is being stored. Something I’m definitely going to have to look into.

After a break to make sure my laptop was charged, I stopped by David Klee’s session, which was called “My Brain Has Blue Screened.” Rather than deep technical content, this was a bunch of DBAs and the like, gathered around swapping war / horror stories. Many of which had me cringing. Excellent idea for a session, and something we may have to do at SQL Saturday Columbus this year, if he’s willing. (Hint, hint…)

After a very tasty lunch, I stopped in to see Kendal Van Dyke set up a SAN-less cluster with SIOS’ Data Keeper product. This wasn’t something I had seen before in the wild and it was certainly interesting. We’ve been kind of trying to move away from failover cluster instance at work in favor of Availability Groups. I’ll have to check this out to see if it may be a better fit for us.

I skipped the next session to re-run the demos for my own two sessions in the afternoon. Good thing I did so. I made a few final adjustments to one of my demos and was ready to rock. My first session, “The Usual SUSPECTs”, which deals with database states, went off without a hitch. “DBA 911 – Database Corruption” went pretty much as it usually does. I was able to get through both sessions without modifying too much, though I did gloss over a couple of things due to the time limit. I was trying very hard to make sure the attendees were able to get to the raffle on time at the end of the day, since you do have to be present to win.

I don’t have much in the way of speaker feedback this time, since the feedback I received was universally positive across the board. The attendees must have been very kind people. For the Usual SUSPECTs session, I did get a pair of really great comments under the heading “How will you use the information you learned here?”

“Not sure if I will, but good to know.” – Trust me, one day, you will. :-)

“Test at office on production. No, just kidding!” – If you do, let me know. I could use the consulting work…

And from the DBA 911 session:

How will you use the information you learned here? “Test Backups”.

My work here is done. See you in Philadelphia? :-)

Thanks for reading.

-David.